2017 APDT Annual Educational Conference & Trade Show


The 2017 APDT Conference will offer a variety of opportunities to improve ourselves as trainers, as business people, and as an industry. From amazing keynote speakers to CE classes to ample opportunities to network and participate in peer-to-peer sharing, the 2017 APDT Conference in Richmond, Virginia is a dynamic event for serious dog-trainers who want to stay at the top of their game.

Download the 2017 Conference Program


Standard: $245.00

Sessions

Welcome, Awards and Business Meeting


Identification: WE01

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

Keynote: Partner Up: Approaches to Working Hand in Hand with Your Shelter


Identification: WE02

Marc details different specifics needs shelters have for behavioral experts and different ways trainers and behavioral experts are needing to keep animals healthy and getting animals adopted in shelters. Also, he will explain how behavioral experts can help animals from entering or returning to shelters.

Speaker(s):
  • Marc Peralta, Executive Director, Best Friends Animal Society
Standard: $20.00

Everyday Tech: Managing Your Digital Life


Identification: WE03

Get ready to take your understanding of everyday technology to the next level. Join Bill as he explains in easy to understand terms how to use the apps, websites and tools people use to make their day more efficient while staying safe. You'll learn about apps, websites, and services to help you with: - scheduling, marketing, and research; finding out if you have a good password; how to manage the 9,999 passwords you have; how to protect your home laptop and mobile phone; how to determine if you've been involved in a hack. Bill does all of this without using any acronyms or tech jargon. You may even get a tour of the dark web.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

Brand YOU: Maximize Your Personal Brand


Identification: WE04

Whether you are a small business owner or a member of a big team, your personal brand contributes to the success of any organization you are affiliated. Your brand may be the difference between you and a competitor. Don’t be overwhelmed! Attend this session to find out more about steps to branding, managing your online presence, and tools to really make you shine!

Speaker(s):
  • Ericka Harney, CFRE, GPC, CAE, CVA, Executive Director, Accounting & Financial Women's Alliance (AFWA) and The Foundation of AFWA
Standard: $20.00

A Dog's View of the WorldA Dog's View of the World

Preview Available

A Dog's View of the World


Identification: WE05

Most dog enthusiasts know that canines must see the world differently from people, but lack more specifics. Because humans rely so heavily on vision, we tend to impose that lens on dogs. However, canine vision differs from humans, and their reliance on vision is less than ours. In this overview presentation, we will take a look at the biology of dog vision as well as hearing and smell. All of these senses really take place in the brain, so we will also explore what is known about canine brains and cognition. Each part will include links back to wolf biology and the context in which these senses developed over time, and the impacts these differences from us have on how a dog views our world.

Link to CEU form for this session: https://apdt.com/recorded-conference-ceu-request/

Speaker(s):
  • Tim Lewis, Ph.D., Wildlife Ecology, University of St. Thomas, MN
Standard: $20.00

Humane Education for ChildrenHumane Education for Children

Preview Available

Humane Education for Children


Identification: WE06

The Richmond SPCA offers over 20,000 hours of humane education each year via tours, school visits, birthday parties, and innovative summer/winter camps --- and we have kids attending our weekly dog-training classes as well. We have learned a whole lot about engaging the next generation of pet owners, inspiring compassion for all animals, teaching the basics of reward-based training (kid timing is often far superior to adult timing) and promoting safety when meeting and greeting dogs. These are topics that ought to be taught repeatedly in every single community and done so via kid-friendly crafts and activities. Interested in providing humane education in your town, in revamping or building a program already in place, or comparing notes on humane education topics? This is the session for you!

Speaker(s):
  • Sarah Babcock, CTC, CPDT-KSA, CBCC-KA, CDBC, Chief of Education & Training, Richmond SPCA
Standard: $20.00

The Real Deal: Arousal, Relaxation, Attention and Self Modulation


Identification: WE07

Many handlers struggle with their dog’s unproductive arousal, lack of self-control, and lack of focus. Sometimes, the struggle is very physical as the handler tries to hang on to the dog using halters, harnesses and other devices. Relaxation is attempted at best in quiet moments here or there in “distraction free” areas, or through exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting for the client) protocols. A multitude of techniques and equipment exists to help handlers physically control their dogs, and to help dogs calm down, focus, relax. But frustrated handlers can feel that they are drowning in a plethora of options that may or may not be effective, even when they are diligent about doing the work. Worse still, they may have a dog who has many trained behaviors but is still challenging when not under specific cue or being kept on task, and who may still need special equipment. This presentation uses lecture, video and interactive exercises to present simple, effective techniques for helping handlers and dogs build the correct foundation for learning:
• Productive arousal (Think & Learn Zone)
• Relaxation (Really Real Relaxation)
• Self modulation (Auto Check-In, and Say Hi 1-2-3).

These techniques are well grounded in behavioral, social and cognitive science, but are simple to learn and apply, even for the novice dog handler.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

Fear Free Veterinary Care: What Dog Trainers Need to Know


Identification: WE08

What is the Fear FreeSM initiative? There was a time when pet professionals focused more on the destination than the journey. That is to say, we had an end point in mind and worked efficiently to accomplish that end point, without much regard to the emotional well-being of the pet or the pet’s person. And perhaps without much regard for any emotions we experienced during the sometimes less than pleasant interaction. Although this lack of attention to emotional well-being could be applied to the way pets were once handled at a grooming facility or training facility, this lecture will focus on the veterinary setting. It will be quite easy to extrapolate the concepts we discuss to any setting in which people and animals interact. The Fear Free initiative began as veterinary health care teams recognized that many pets and clients alike experienced distress when they visited the animal hospital. While dogs drag their owners into the pet food store hoping for treats and toys, these very same dogs only enter the veterinary hospital if they are coaxed and cajoled. In the examination room, many pets used to struggle while teams of assistants tried to hold them down. It could be difficult to get an accurate assessment of temperature or heart rate in these distressed animals. The Fear Free initiative offers a fresh new way of delivering veterinary care. With the help of an Advisory Panel of many animal experts, guidelines have been created to facilitate a calm veterinary experience. These guidelines consider ways to manage the physical environment as well as the social environment. Stress matters! Application of Fear Free Fear Free concepts can be applied to the stress associated with all aspects of a veterinary visit. From the car ride to the waiting area. From the exam room to the hospital ward. And even after a patient returns home, he may experience stress associated with special care or exercise restrictions needed during the recovery period. With a little guidance, we can change our behavior and use a quiet approach. We can feed treats to cheer the pet that is willing to eat. With music playing and pheromones diffusing in the background, pets and people alike often relax. But what can we do with the patient that still cannot be safely or comfortably handled? Can we help the patient that is so nervous about coming to the hospital that it is impossible to deliver the most basic of care? Yes we can! Behavior modification rocks! Behavior modification To give their patients the skills to relax and accept handling, veterinarians and pet owners need the help of behaviorists and trainers. The first step in enabling patients is to recognize signs of stress, albeit subtle. Fear and stress can be reflected in panting, trembling, salivating, and attempts to escape or even bite. But did you know that distress can also be reflected by fidgeting or freezing? The frozen pet is not the calm pet at all and her well-being is not good! Perhaps the most terrifying part of the veterinary experience is being subjected to physical restraint. By teaching pets to present themselves for examination, the need for restraint is all but eliminated. Special skills During our session, we will discuss some of the important skills needed for a general examination as well as for management of some common illnesses or procedures. Brush up on your clicker training. Those patients that are too terrified to even take food will also benefit from a systematic desensitization and counterconditioning (DSCC) to all the scary aspects of the veterinary visit. We will talk about ways to develop a customized DSCC protocol that meets the need of an individual. Networking with veterinarians Veterinary health care teams may not know that you are available to help. Integrating the behavioral needs of pets with their medical needs is a win-win approach. Let’s discuss some opportunities in your area!

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

Observations on the Socialization of Dogs


Identification: WE09

The current dog world promotes and supports a vague notion of 'Socialization' that encourages dog owners to have their dogs meet many strangers during their puppyhood and to play with other puppies in order to grow up friendly with other dogs. There are few specific details on how to do this, and even fewer adjustments for differing temperaments--from fearful to bold, sociable and non-sociable. What does playing with other puppies teach our puppies? Are some of the socializing techniques we promote outdated for the modern world--a world in which there are more dogs, more multiple dog households, more play between dogs and seemingly less between owner and dog, less access to nature, and what's seems to be a growing number of problematic temperaments? What do we do if we get our dogs at the age of five months (past the apparent critical socialization period)? Or at a year? Are there still training and socialization techniques that might help dogs? By showing video footage of some of the current practices I will show behaviors and offer observations of what I believe can be fallout from current practices, or owner-interpretation of vague recommendations. I will also show video footage of ways to escort dogs through the universe and 'socialize' them in such a way as to thwart the trend of owners letting their leashed and unleashed dogs descend upon any dog they encounter. I wish to challenge some of the current socialization recommendations and offer ways of encouraging new puppy owners and new owners of dogs of all ages to raise dogs that find their owners most important and fun, are confident enough to navigate society, feel safe in their environments, find a purpose/work, and are hopefully able to cope with whatever the world throws at them.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

It’s Time to Train the Trainer About Fear Free


Identification: TH01

Chances are you’ve loved pets from the time you were very young. Chances are your parents probably have stories of you trying to “fix up” the family pets and train them to have better manners. The last thing you would ever do is to knowingly make life worse for pets. But chances also are you’re harming pets more often than you know or would like to believe.

You’ve adopted positive-based methods to train pets, but may not have realized that you also have a key part to play in looking after both the physical and emotional wellbeing of pets. How would you like to take your career to a new level of impact, where pets live happier, healthier, fuller lives, pet owners look at you as a pet health expert, and where you achieve the financial success and emotional wealth you never dared to dream possible?

It’s not a dream; it’s here today in the form of a transformative initiative called Fear Free, where the goal is to “take the pet out of petrified.”

The veterinary profession wants to work with trainers like you to reduce fear, anxiety, and stress (FAS) in pets’ lives, increase enrichment activities, and help pets live, happy, healthy, full lives. Embrace Fear Free and you’ll “do well, by doing good.”

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00