2014 APDT Annual Educational Conference & Trade Show

Oct 15, 2014 ‐ Oct 18, 2014


The 2014 APDT Annual Educational Conference and Tradeshow will be held in Hartford CT, October 15th – the 18th. Prestigious speakers and engaging seminars for new and veteran trainers alike make the APDT Conference a “must see” event. Can’t attend in person? Two full days of Conference will be live-streamed, directly into your home, office, facility, or anywhere you wish to watch! Earn CEUs, host a gathering for friends and colleagues, or simply sit back in your bed and watch the likes of Patricia McConnell, Clive Wynne, Ray Coppinger, and many more.

Download the 2014 Conference Workbook

Standard: $245.00

Sessions

Conference WelcomeConference Welcome

Preview Available

Conference Welcome

Oct 15, 2014 8:45am ‐ Oct 15, 2014 9:30am

Identification: WE01

Welcome to attendees, overview of organization, info about Hartford CT, and event details.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participant will gain knowledge about the biology of trauma, including its comparative effects on people and dogs.
  • Participants will gain knowledge about the treatment of trauma, both in people and dogs, including the use of dogs as adjunctive therapists to people with PTSD.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

Keynote: People, Dogs and Psychological Trauma

Oct 15, 2014 9:30am ‐ Oct 15, 2014 11:00am

Identification: WE02

Psychological Trauma is defined as an event or experience that completely overwhelms an individual's ability to cope. This presentation will initiate an inquiry into three basic questions related to trauma in people and dogs: If we accept that both dogs and people can be traumatized, how would our experiences be similar? How would they be different? What can treatments for human victims of trauma teach us about treating trauma in dogs? What about the other direction—from dogs to people? What do we know, both from science and anecdotal experience, that can help us evaluate the practice of using dogs to help people recover from trauma? Included will be discussions about whether dogs can suffer from PTSD, how to determine if a dog's behavior might be related to trauma, and the costs and benefits of asking dogs to help people heal from psychological trauma.

Learning Objectives:

  • Participant will gain knowledge about the biology of trauma, including its comparative effects on people and dogs.
  • Participants will gain knowledge about the treatment of trauma, both in people and dogs, including the use of dogs as adjunctive therapists to people with PTSD.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

Canine EvolutionCanine Evolution

Preview Available

Canine Evolution

Oct 15, 2014 11:30am ‐ Oct 15, 2014 12:30pm

Identification: WE04

Don't miss out on this opportunity to be captivated by the renowned Dr. Ray Coppinger as he shares his extensive experience with, research in, and knowledge of canines and their evolution.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

Do You See What I See? Medical Problems Masquerading as Behavioral Problems

Oct 15, 2014 2:00pm ‐ Oct 15, 2014 3:30pm

Identification: WE05

As a veterinarian, clinical experience tells us that the majority of pet owner observations are in some way related to behavior.  For example, "my cat isn't as playful as he used to be", "my dog is really hungry lately", or "my pet isn't jumping onto the bed as easily as she used to". Did you also know that many of the concerns that may cause a dog owner to seek out the help of a trainer could also be signs of underlying medical issues?  For example, a dog that is hesitant to navigate the weave poles or is reluctant to go for rides in the car might be experiencing orthopedic pain or discomfort.  A dog that is showing aggression toward their owner might be suffering from an ear infection, a dog that is difficult to housetrain might have a urinary tract infection or be affected by incontinence, and a dog that is licking surfaces excessively might have ulcers or acid reflux problems? These and other medical problems masquerading as behavioral problems will be covered, along with some of the signs that you may notice while training or during a behavior assessment.  This presentation will also cover some of the ways in which you can discuss these issues with your clients without stepping on the toes of the pet's veterinarian, and how to bring these observations to the attention of the dog's veterinarian in a professional and respectful manner. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Identify common behavioral problems that may require additional medical assessment by the dog's veterinarian
  • Develop methods for bringing your observations to the attention of the pet owner and to the primary care veterinarian in a professional manner

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

A Short History of Man's Best Friend

Oct 15, 2014 2:00pm ‐ Oct 15, 2014 5:15pm

Identification: WE06

I have spent the last five years traveling the world trying to understand the mysterious origins of dogs. At first I believed those who said that people created dogs by selecting tame wolves to help them hunt. Then I spoke to people who know wolves and realized you could never take one hunting. Then I believed those who told me dogs arose when people started agriculture and wolves that lingered around our trash became dogs. But then I spoke to archeologists who have evidence of dogs from before agriculture started. The idea of dogs as trash scavengers is also difficult to reconcile with the intimate space they occupy in human homes. Now I have finally cracked how dogs came to be – a process that involved multiple steps over thousands of years. A process I call, "The Genesis of Dogs in Seven Days.

Learning Objectives:

  • Appreciate that there is a mystery surrounding the origin of the dog
  • Understand the limitations of existing theories of the origins of dogs
  • Assess "The Genesis of Dogs in Seven Days."

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

New Concepts for the Prevention and Treatment of Dog Aggression

Oct 15, 2014 2:00pm ‐ Oct 15, 2014 5:15pm

Identification: WE07

People are always surprised when later in life, their friendly and socialized puppy becomes shy, standoffish, wary, fearful, reactive and aggressive towards people or other dogs, even though developing fear of the unfamiliar later in life is a normal and adaptive development process. These problems can be easily prevented with lots of early socialization and ongoing classical conditioning.  For older dogs that are past the Critical Period of Socialization, the treatment protocols are virtually identical to prevention protocols (classical and operant conditioning, progressive desensitization and socialization), except that they are more complicated, take much longer and are sometimes dangerous. Recently though, new techniques have been developed to accelerate and maximize classical conditioning, progressive desensitization and ultimately, re-socialization. Differential classical conditioning (DCC) enables trainers to operantly condition at the same time as classically condition the dog. Set-ups accelerate classical conditioning and using kibble and tug toys (fairly low-value primary reinforcers) empowered as the highest-value mega-secondary reinforcers maximizes classical conditioning.

Learning Objectives:

  • Compare and contrast early socialization protocols for young dogs with treatment protocols for addressing fear and aggression in older dogs
  • Evaluate how differential classical conditioning (DCC) and set-ups to accelerate classical conditioning
  • Compare and contrast low-value primary reinforcers and highest-value mega-secondary reinforcers

Speaker(s):
  • Ian Dunbar, PhD, MRCVS, CPDT, Director, Center of Applied Animal Behavior
Standard: $20.00

Beat the Clock - Shave Time Off: Work, Create More Margin in Life

Oct 15, 2014 2:00pm ‐ Oct 15, 2014 5:15pm

Identification: WE08

Ever feel overwhelmed?  Your schedule out of control?  Too much to do and too many commitments pulling you in different directions?  Ever feel like you're too busy for the things that matter most? Wonder how you can spend so much time with other people's dogs and not enough time with your own?  If so, you are not alone.  Juggling your dog training business on top of everything else you do is hard! More and more, people are falling victim to the "busy trap" and losing a sense of control, meaning and purpose for their lives. This informative and inspirational seminar designed to help you gain more relaxed control over your life. You will learn key concepts and best practices for managing multiple commitments and investing your time and energy in the things that are really important to you. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Name the principle of self-management which isn't really about time at all.
  • Create a calendar of their ideal week during the workshop which they can use to get their schedule in order
  • Create a process for capturing and prioritizing their work each morning
  • See the importance of a weekly review to give them more time to spend on what's important
  • Compile a list of tools and resources they can begin using right away to help put order back in their life

 

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

Observations from the FieldObservations from the Field

Preview Available

Observations from the Field

Oct 15, 2014 2:00pm ‐ Oct 15, 2014 5:15pm

Identification: WE10

How much dog-dog socialization is truly necessary for the health and well-being of a puppy or adult dog? Is play between dogs important to their overall mental and behavioral health? If so, why? What kind of play? How much play? How much exposure to unfamiliar dogs should one dog experience? If we raise and try to teach our puppies not to mouth/bite our skin and clothes, how come we raise our puppies to mouth and bite other dogs? After spending the last few years filming engagements between unfamiliar and familiar dogs, I have many observations that make me challenge some of the mores and prevailing beliefs inherent in the dog world. While I can offer few answers, the questions that have arisen from studying, particularly in slow motion, hundreds of hours of video footage of dog-dog interactions, pose fascinating quandaries about what I thought I knew,  and merit discussion. Join me for an in-depth look at dog-dog engagement. I will be showing footage of healthy play, risky play, and engagements that I believe LOOK like play but are instead what I believe is practice for violence and harm. Or is that what play is?  I will be showing footage of low risk, medium risk and high risk behaviors, and make recommendations on how and when to interrupt to avoid violent engagements.

 

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

Panel Discussion: Trauma and Fear

Oct 15, 2014 3:45pm ‐ Oct 15, 2014 5:15pm

Identification: WE09

Join us for an interactive discussion with this esteemed panel of professionals, each of whom brings a unique perspective to the topic. We begin by hearing from each panelist as they discuss their own experiences: what they've learned over their careers, how the topic has impacted their own pets, how they've handled cases, what has surprised them most, and more. Next, a lively discussion between panel members will highlight where they may agree, may disagree, or how each might handle a scenario. Finally, stick around for or participate in a live Q&A session with the audience and panel. This panel discussion will focus on the various forms trauma may take, how it can impact dogs at various developmental stages, short-term and long-term prognosis, what fear looks like, and more. Listen to multiple perspectives on how to help humans facing fearful behavior, and how we can make life a little less scary for companion dogs.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00

The APDT Foundation Presents: Do "Best Practices" in Off-Leash Dog Parks Exist?

Oct 16, 2014 8:00am ‐ Oct 16, 2014 8:45am

Identification: TH01

Although essential for a dog’s welfare, dog-dog play interactions can easily lead to aggression. Furthermore, play-induced aggression may be especially prevalent in limited control settings, such as off-leash dog parks. Unfortunately, play has not received much empirical attention relative to other forms of dog behavior, limiting our knowledge of how and when owners or trainers should intervene during dog-dog play.  In addition, previous research has suggested that experienced owners and trainers have difficulty distinguishing between play and aggression in dogs. There is thus a large degree of variation in conceptions of what constitutes appropriate and inappropriate play. Without the knowledge of behavioral precursors of aggression that reliably occur during play, the safety of both dogs and their owners may be jeopardized. The aims of this study were therefore to: (1) determine if there are discrete behaviors that are reliable predictors to play-induced aggression between dogs in off-leash dog parks, (2) to measure the relative likelihood of owners responding to behavioral precursors of play-induced aggression, and finally (3) to gather data on other contextual factors (e.g., breed, size, number of play partners) that may influence the nature of dog-dog play. We found that interdog aggression occurred in approximately 1 in 10 play bouts in public dog parks; in addition, owners intervened on less than 5% of these bouts. The results also suggest that a number of play behaviors and play types are reliable predictors of both play-induced aggression and owner interventions. Importantly, no single behavior predicted aggression from play 100% of the time, suggesting strongly that other contextual factors influence the likelihood that play may lead to aggression. These results will lead to the development of interventions aimed at train and maintain appropriate social play between dogs that can be utilized by owners, trainers, and behavior consultants. Accurately identifying the conditions that lead to welfare-positive play and those that predict aggressive interactions is likely to have a significant impact on the well being of domestic dogs in a variety of applied settings. 
 

Speaker(s):
Standard: $20.00