2013 APDT Annual Educational Conference & Trade Show

Oct 23, 2013 ‐ Oct 27, 2013


Celebrate 20 years of the premier conference for the dog training and behavior field!

Download the 2013 Conference Workbook

Standard: $245.00

Sessions

Dissecting the Dynamics of Dog-Dog Play

Oct 26, 2013 9:00am ‐ Oct 26, 2013 10:30am

Identification: SA04

To make accurate assessments and keep dogs safe, we must understand play's subtle dynamics. When is a play bow not an invitation? Two's company, but is three a crowd? What effects can owner interference have? Learn to identify dangerous situations and intervene safely. Viewing extensive video and slow motion playback of split-second signals and maneuvers will greatly improve your observational skills. You'll never look at dog-dog play the same way!

Learning Objectives:
1. Analyze subtle body language and signals of dogs as they engage in play.
2. Identify what constitutes safe play, and when intervention is warranted.
3. Determine when dogs are becoming overly aroused during play.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

"I Don't Want a Treat!" Positive Applications of Negative Reinforcement

Oct 26, 2013 10:45am ‐ Oct 26, 2013 12:15pm

Identification: SA05

Negative reinforcement is a highly controversial, and sometimes misunderstood, quadrant of operant conditioning. Despite the image of negative reinforcement as a euphemism for positive punishment, there are a variety of techniques available to trainers that apply negative reinforcement in a force-free, humane manner specifically in situations involving fearful and aggressive behavior. In addition to outlining several humane negative reinforcement techniques, this presentation will provide information on when it is appropriate to use such techniques, and how best to ensure they are used in an animal-friendly manner.

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify humane applications of negative reinforcement
2. Distinguish situations in which humane negative reinforcement may be effective
3. Assess which humane negative reinforcement techniques are likely to yield the best results

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Aggression and Aggressiveness in Context

Oct 26, 2013 10:45am ‐ Oct 26, 2013 12:15pm

Identification: SA07

The scientific study of aggression is as old as psychology and behavioural biology. Theories abound, and there are interesting conflicting perspectives: Behavioural (behaviourist), ethological (biological), ecological, neurophysiological, psychological (cognitive, and socio-affective), etc. Aggression is also often confused with aggressiveness, and is often discussed "out of context". Ironically, dogs may be one of the few species "out-of-context" by virtue of thousands of years of domestication. We will examine the origins of canine aggression (in the social context) and discuss it in a comparative perspective (mentioning other species), situating aggression within other social behaviours that are arguably more important in defining social dynamics. We will also discuss the neuroscience of aggression and how it fits within social rules (including in relation to dominance) and in relation to affiliative behaviours. Antidotes to aggression such as play, confidence, calmness, and control will be discussed. Nothing in our understanding of aggression makes sense without an understanding of context, social dynamics, personality, and the brain.

Learning Objectives:
1. Distinguish between predispositions (aggressiveness) and events (aggression)
2. Understand the cause(s) of aggression at the physiological, individual and social level
3. Understand the context of aggression, from anxiety, stress, to dominance and complex social dynamics
4. Explore the roots of canine aggression: Why do animals engage in aggressive acts? (the basic psychology and ethology of aggression)

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Creating Your Own Community-Based Training Curriculum

Oct 26, 2013 10:45am ‐ Oct 26, 2013 12:15pm

Identification: SA08

"Train the Dog that Shows Up!" is more formally known as the "Community-based Canine Companion Training Curriculum" model. This award-winning, scientifically-supported method showcases the effectiveness of exposing dogs in your community to one hour, drop-in, public-access training in order to gain/retain them as clients and reduce the likelihood of those canines being relinquished to area rescue groups.

Learning Objectives:
1. Analyze how to improve relationships with humans
2. Evaluate who and why to focus programs and services on excellent communication
3. Identify the value of teaching behaviors that are acceptable in a public-access setting

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Fearful Fido to Confident Canine

Oct 26, 2013 1:30pm ‐ Oct 26, 2013 3:00pm

Identification: SA09

The class addresses what fear looks like. What are some signs of fear? Does fear always look timid and shying away, or are there other lesser known symptoms of fear? What are some of the common fears? What do you do if a dog has fear? Why is addressing fear so important? Are there ways to address fear in early puppyhood? What are some training and management strategies to address fear? What do you do when training isn't helping? Are there ways to work in conjunction with a veterinarian over fear issues?

Learning Objectives:
1. Recognize even less commonly known signals of canine fear
2. Assess common types of fear that canines display
3. Analyze some ways to address fear in dogs
4. Recognize the importance of management and working with a veterinarian

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Poster Sessions Presentations (Scientific)

Oct 26, 2013 1:30pm ‐ Oct 26, 2013 3:00pm

Identification: SA12

This session will be the official "Poster Presentations" from research posters which have been solicited from academic (faculty, students, and researchers) and professional (dog trainers, shelter staff, veterinary staff). Submitted posters will highlights research in topics relevant to dog behavior and training including: preliminary results, completed studies, summaries of relevant published research, and position papers. The aim of the posters is to facilitate dissemination of research results to the broader community of dog training practitioners.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

A Rationale and Plan for Incorporating APDT C.L.A.S.S. Into Your Training Curriculum

Oct 26, 2013 1:30pm ‐ Oct 26, 2013 3:00pm

Identification: SA11

The APDT C.L.A.S.S. program is an exciting development in standards for pet dog training. When combined into an existing dog training curriculum it can create a market niche making your classes more distinctive and attractive to prospective clients and those who refer to you. I will discuss how we have incorporated APDT C.L.A.S.S. into all levels of our curriculum and how we have marketed APDT C.L.A.S.S. to our community.

Learning Objectives:
1. Evaluate how APDT C.L.A.S.S. fits in with any pet dog training curriculum
2. Identify how to market your programs inclusion of APDT C.L.A.S.S. as a benefit over non-C.L.A.S.S. offerings to prospective clients and veterinarians.

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

A Family AffairA Family Affair

Preview Available

A Family Affair

Oct 26, 2013 3:30pm ‐ Oct 26, 2013 5:00pm

Identification: SA13

Families can create a challenge in classes and often require a different format for classes. While families can be a challenge they can allow trainers the opportunity to start a new class to their current classes. This workshop is focused to give trainers the opportunity to view a class structure with exercises that include interactive exercises for the whole family.

Learning Objectives:
1. Demonstrate safe and effective exercises for children in a dog training class
2. Present ideas for classes focused on families
3. Practice exercises that all members of the family can participate in

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Shut Up Already! Dealing with Excessive Barking

Oct 26, 2013 3:30pm ‐ Oct 26, 2013 5:00pm

Identification: SA14

Excessive barking is a common problem. While this issue may seem straightforward to clients, dogs bark excessively for many different reasons. Reducing barking can also require significant changes to a dog’s environment. As a result, cases involving barking are often difficult for both trainer and client. This presentation will define several major types of barking and provide suggested solutions for each of them. It will also address how to determine which type of barking is happening, and describe ways to get better client compliance for training and management.

Learning Objectives:
1. Define the most common categories of barking
2. Assess why a dog is barking
3. Improve client compliance

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00

Get Better Results from Your Non-Sequential Classes

Oct 26, 2013 3:30pm ‐ Oct 26, 2013 5:00pm

Identification: SA15

Levels, modular, and open enrollment classes are all the rage. But the challenge of students and dogs at multiple levels often renders the classroom experience a collection of mini-privates, with the instructor running frantic to meet everyone's needs. It doesn't have to be so. Come learn a unique approach to teaching these classes that provides a cohesive group experience for your students—and relief from "winging it" for you.

Learning Objectives:
1. Evaluate principles of effective curriculum design for non-sequential classes
2. Assess how students at various levels may be taught effectively together
3. Determine how to apply learning theory to their curriculum development

Speaker(s):
Standard: $24.00
Print Certificate
Review Answers
Print Transcript
Completed on: token-completed_on
Review Answers
Please select the appropriate credit type:
/
test_id: 
credits: 
completed on: 
* - Indicates answer is required.
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
token-index
token-content
/
/
token-index
token-content